BOYHOOD – Growing Up in Real Time

Boyhood

Boyhood  is that most modern of movies. As self-actualisation in the Western world fast becomes our primary goal, Director Richard Linklater offers up a more innocent take on growing up. It’s real and wonderfully refreshing.

This boy is no internet-hooked, selfie taker.  His is a childhood of bikes and hiking, a lo-tech slice of real life.  A wide-eyed, silent observer of the world and his family, Mason is so quiet that it comes as a shock when he starts to articulate his own thoughts. When he does speak it is mainly to express his own uncertainty. This is no hip or cynical commentator, rather a boy lost in wonder at the beauty and sadness of the world.

images-272

Much has been made of the innovative twelve year shooting period that follows the same young actor, Ellar Coltrane, from age six to eighteen as he grows up. Yet there are other points of difference that mark out this subtle, involving indie drama. Linklater is king of the anti-drama. There are no big events – no murders, no rapes and only a little violence. There are no good guys and no bad guys and – some would argue – not much story either.  The film moves us with a series of small but important moments in a family’s life. In the absence of the conventional dramatic climax in a scene, I found myself crying at unexpected moments, during a transitional scene, moved by reminders of my own family.

It is the most relatable of films – in that it takes the standard clichés of the coming of age movie – the ball game, the first love, the graduation, and presents them as fresh and uncontrived.  Many scenes were based on improvisation and the closeness of the on-screen family (headed up by the impressive Ethan Hawke and Patricia Arquette) means they rub along in an utterly convincing and authentic way.

images-274

This is a world you want to be part of. Linklater’s liberal value system eschews the obvious and embraces contradiction – the educated alcoholic, the decent army guy, the ‘flaky musician’ Dad who seeks out security. This is a loving portrait of America, land of the individual yet also home of the gun and the bible, and he embraces it all with a breadth of vision that takes your breath away.

images-271

The scope of Boyhood’s epic time frame recalls older, Hollywood movies like Giant that tell the history of America through one extended clan. Yet Linklater’s natural, real time ‘fly on the wall’ approach also shares its DNA with the ground-breaking British documentary series Seven Up! which revisited the same children every seven years as they grew up and through adulthood.

Time in a movie is a construct. The idea that a movie unfolds over a two hour period and offers up a few moments in time is pure illusion. ‘Boyhood’ challenges this construct and offers up an alternative vision. It also makes you realise how phoney most on-screen attempts at ageing are. The shock and pleasure of seeing people age for real on camera contrasts with Hollywoods’ obsession with our actors (especially women) looking forever young. We all grow up – and we all age – and while countless films have celebrated the joys of coming of age, it is rare to see so many generations reflected in one story with such a light touch.

images-277

There is great joy in ‘Boyhood’ and I was reminded many times of my own family while watching it. There is a sense of community we get when we watch a film that reflects our own experience. We should celebrate that.

images-275

Advertisements

A Girl’s Eye View of True Detective

true-detective-poster-16x9-1

‘Ever fallen in love with someone you shouldn’t have fallen in love with?’  That’s how I feel about True Detective.  It’s silent, brooding and masculine as hell.  All the guys I know love it but to begin with, as a girl, I wasn’t so sure.

It’s true there’s double the eye-candy – you can choose between Matthew McConaughey as the moody intellectual with the razor-blade cheekbones, or Woody Harrelson as the fresh faced, good ole cop with a naughty twinkle in his eye for the ladies.  But the only ladies you’ll see are hookers, wives and pissed-off girlfriends.  Nothing new there you might say.  So what’s the hook for this girl?

This is the old made new, the generic buddy cop movie made strangely particular by the beauty of the language and the stillness of the pauses between these two men as they drive through the Louisiana landscape.  Nic Pizzolatto’s writing is elegant, often spare but sometimes dense, intellectual and witty.  This is dialogue worth tuning in to, by turns philosophical, self-loathing and slyly funny.  As a film it’s impossibly beautiful, the big skies, the yellow skin tones,  the Southern heat and dust made visible by director Cary Joji Fukunaga and cinematographer Adam Arkapaw.

images-218

And then there are the two star turns – McConaughey the initial draw as the screwed up anti-hero, but with Harrelson subverting your expectations as his character becomes less charming and more a drowning man clutching at women like straws.

images-220

Like my other favourite ‘slow-burn’ series from last year – Hannibal and Top of the Lake, True Detective ain’t in no hurry to tell you the plot, using the now common device of ending a quiet episode with a sudden glimpse of horror.  The momentum keeps building.  Like House of Cards, you’re watching one long story unfold over a series.  There is the odd flashy set piece but it’s the incremental gains you watch for.

It’s a masculine vision of the world that reminds me of The Godfather, not in its description of mob life but in its belief that it’s ‘kill or be killed’.  The characters are in the grip of ancient laws, desires and grudges beyond their control or understanding.

images-226

It creates a view of the male psyche, trapped in a world limited by the very pleasures used to drown his sorrows.  Sex, drugs, alcohol and violence  are seen as useless aides in the face of the loneliness of life, they only make things worse by confronting you with a vision of yourself you can’t stand to be around.   You could argue many male-oriented films indulge in these activities while revealing them as hollow and self-defeating – but it’s the quality of the writing and the silence enveloping these characters on their long, existential drives that demands our attention and evokes a desire to understand them.

images-222

That and they’re just so goddamn cool. Like Billie Holiday, I am in love with the ‘No Good Man’, but I also want to whisper, ‘Don’t Explain.’

Want to Write? Work with Actors!

Anne-FletcherThis week I’ve been directing actors in rehearsals at Ealing Studios.  Actors take your words and bring them to rich, complex life.  So what can you learn by having actors rehearse your script in progress?

1)   If they don’t get it, no one will. Actors are your first audience.  Their questions are about clarity:  ‘Why does she do that? How experienced is he at his job? How long have they known each other?’  Your script may be deliberately ambiguous on these points.  It may just be plain unclear.  Listen to what they ask you and adjust accordingly.

2)   They make choices, so should you.  A lot of the conversation during rehearsal is about emphasis and interpretation. ‘Would he punch her or punch the door instead?’ ‘When does she decide it’s over between them?’ ‘Is he really crazy or just afraid he’s going crazy because of the way he’s been treated?’  Some of these are actors’ choices but they can help you fill out the characters and make them real so your work becomes as precise and nuanced as their playing.

amour-2

3)   Timing is everything.  When and how information is released is crucial in all scripts, especially when it affects the characters’ behaviour.  An actor might ask, ‘Have I always known this or have I just discovered it?’ When rewriting, you can use actors’ feedback to focus this release of information, especially where it provokes an emotional response in the character.

4)   Turn Around.  Identifying the turning point in a scene is acting class 101.  Yet many early scripts feature scenes that have no real turning point. Without this the scene feels ‘undramatic’ and actors will have problems playing it. It doesn’t have to be a big moment but something has to happen to move the story forwards or force the character to take action.  Use rehearsals to find these moments and to identify and cut scenes which are treading water or repetition.

5)   Count the Beats.  Actors love to find smaller moments or ‘beats’ within a scene to play that change the direction of the scene – for example  showing the ebb and flow in the balance of power between two characters before a decisive move is made. You can create these in your scenes and then refine them with the actors.  Good actors will give you new ‘beats’ you didn’t know were there.

6)   Give them characters they can build on.  Actors love characters they can get their teeth into, with a strong emotional arc with highs and lows,  discovering things about their world, making life-changing decisions. If you lay this groundwork, actors will breathe emotional life into your characters, which can inspire you in turn to write them even greater moments.

1026

7)   Love what they give you and accept it.  Making a film is a truly collaborative affair. Trust actors to explore your work in rehearsal and help you change it for the better.  Actors, like the director and the producer, are ultimately servants of the piece, your piece of writing and so let them serve you and it to the best of their abilities.

Three Ways to Work with Actors on your Draft Script.

580x318.fitandcrop

1)   The Script Reading.

This is the easiest – and cheapest – way to get input on your draft script.  Find a comfy living room or big kitchen, provide food and drink.  Actors will often do a reading as a favour, as a way to stretch their acting muscles and meet new people, or to get involved with a project on the ground floor. It can become a nice way for folk to network and get something back. But don’t promise roles to actors who read for you unless you can deliver. This is hard to guarantee if you don’t know who’s going to pick it up yet.  Send the script out  a week in advance, to give actors time to re-read, make notes and think about the roles.

Keep the listeners to a select few whose opinions you trust.  It’s a great way to really hear the script without having all the problems smoothed away by clever rehearsal. This kind of private reading is very different from the public rehearsed reading of a polished script where the goal is to raise the profile of the project and/or financing, although this may also provide useful feedback at a later stage for you and the production team.

580x318-1.fitandcrop

2)   The Script Workshop.

This could be a day, a weekend or longer  and may need a decent size rehearsal space.  This demands a bigger time commitment from actors, so you could offer a fee.   Another incentive is that helping you develop your script may result in them becoming attached to the project.  Advertise for actors on websites like Casting Call Pro or try The Actors Centre.  Scenes are played out in full, not just read, giving actors more freedom to interpret and test the material and for you to explore new storylines.   You can video rehearsals for reference later – but ask permission first and agree that the video will not be posted online  (unless agreed as part of a Kickstarter campaign).  If you don’t want to direct the actors, then find a friendly director to do it for you so you can observe.  Try Shooting People.org to find independent film-makers looking to collaborate.  Make sure it’s someone you like and trust and that they understand the key themes, character arcs and genre of your story.  Ask yourself what they’re bringing to the process in terms of approach and discuss what they hope to get out of it.  Sit in on the workshop or, if your prefer, watch the video later to see what questions they and the actors are asking of the material.  You can even transcribe the scenes developed in the workshops for future use, with written consent from the actors involved.  Some writer-directors like to create whole scripts this way.

images-148

3)   Rehearsing a Script in Pre-Production.  

The rehearsal of your script with the cast as they prepare to shoot can be the best way to test, refine and polish your work to create the shooting script.  The story can still go through big transformations  as real locations are factored in to visually expand the story.  The director brings their vision to bear taking the visual storytelling to the next level.  As a writer let the script go to the director and actors now. Be aware that as actors get really close to the shooting date they may become wary of big script changes as they worry about learning new lines or changing what’s already working in performance.  You may yourself feel that the script is now locked and should not be altered too much in rehearsal!  Yet film-making is full of such last minute changes.  Everyone is trying to make the film the best it can be, so a little goodwill and understanding can go a long way.

8611559186_86a1d19e16

Rehearsing your script with actors can be the most fun you can have as a writer and certainly one of the most rewarding ways to develop your story if you let them in and listen to their feedback wholeheartedly.

How have you worked with actors to improve your writing? Leave your comments here or contact me via Twitter @Emlin32.  Happy rehearsing!